Content, Collaboration and Curation…

Social media has moved from truly a “social venue” to a way that educators, parents and professionals learn, collaborate, share and ultimately gather (curate) information.  Those who have made that “mindshift” from “social” to “learning” know that with a 140 character tweet, post or search for a “pin” on their topic they are a little closer to a personal level of expertise than before they engaged in social media.

So the next question, once you have the information you searched for or just came across in your “lurking,” is what do you do with this information once you have it so you can come back to it, share it, or even add to it?

That is where curation comes into play.  I have my favorites and a few tips. Here are the ones I am most familiar:
Pinterest logo

Pinterest is probably the best reflection of who I am in all areas of my life. I curate specifically for other purposes with other venues that I will mention below, but Pinterest is where I collect for all areas of my life. Pinterest is also a great place for a single image idea or curation by specific topic. Sharing with this is as open or closed as you choose. You can have secret boards (a friend of mine had one when she was planning her wedding) that you only invite a few people to share, or it can be open. The other great thing about Pinterest is that, like me, many people curate their life. While I may love a fellow curators boards on organization, I may not share their interest with water sports. I can choose to only follow certain boards to keep my follows focused to what interest me.
I am still learning how to share out with others and Pinterest has really updated this in the last few months, but I don’t like to post every Pin to Twitter or Facebook… that tends to annoy my Twitter followers and Facebook friends. I have noticed that a good “housecleaning” or “reorganizing” of your boards or reposting is a unobtrusive way to share/collaborate. I recently did this and the reposting of my posts I had reorganized/reposted was epic.

Scoopit Logo
Scoop.it was introduced to me through a PLN chat #nisdNOV8 moderated by our District’s Instructional Technology team. It was my answer on how to keep track of all the great information I was collecting/learning on Twitter but was struggling to absorb the vast amount of information I was coming into contact with and wanting to be able to digest with more depth. Not to mention, once I determined the information as beneficial to my learning, I needed a way to turn around and share. Scoop.it was that answer. I will warn you it is addictive and you can have up to 5 Scoop.it boards for free, but then you must pay for more. My need to be micro-organized could not be accomplished in 5, so I pay $6.99 a month for an education account to be able to have up to 20 boards. Currently I am utilizing it for scoops that are related to educational technology and the sub-topics that relate to the vastly growing and necessary componenet of technology in education. I have found that the ability to share the entire board, a single scoop and the suggestions for scoops it provides me helps enhance the content I am already curating from my PLNs on Twitter. I also like this method of curation as it has the opportunity for people to follow each individual board, make suggestions and respond to each individual scoop.

Flipboard logo

Flipboard is my most recent curation exploration. I am truly using this application for more lengthy text/online magazines and for educational topics such as leadership development, collaboration, curriculum design and classroom approaches from a practice and philosophy essential for effectiveness. I still struggle with “flipping” content I find outside of what Flipboard “hosts” but am finding ways to import.

Of course there are a ton of other options when curating. My former principal successfully utilizes
paperli logo

I have dabbled in the utilization of
Youtube pic

No matter the medium used, there are a few things I suggest you ask yourself:
1) Will your curation make sense to others with whom you share?
2) What is the purpose of your curation?
3) How will you orgainize it for ease of curation and those that will be hopefully benefitting from your curation?
4) How will you determine an item appropriate for curation? Will you read it all the way through? Do you consider the reliability of the original source?
5) How will your curations reflect you as a person and professional?

Above all, share your learning… Tweet it, email it, Pin it or Facebook it. You benefitted in some way enough you felt it worthy to curate. Of course, honor the author or the origin of the curation, but then “Pass it on!”

Please feel free to comment on this blog other ways to curate as well as comment if any of the ways mentioned are beneficial to you as well. Look for additional blog posts about other methods for curation in the future… guest bloggers are welcome!!!!

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8 thoughts on “Content, Collaboration and Curation…

  1. Hi Kirsten. Thanks for sharing on this important topic. I like how you shared some of the ways you curate for not only your own benefit, but for others, as well. That takes one from the “consumer” mindset to the “connected-collaborative-creator” mindset, don’t you think? I also like the questions you pose for those engaging in the curation process. While I was involved in ETMOOC (Ed Tech. MOOC), a few people took the time to draw out the connections they had with others, and curation was a part of that. In the next couple of weeks, I’m going to be working on that myself. There are some curation tools I haven’t really tried using, such as Scoopit!, Pinterest (not just a girlie thing anymore…LOL), RebelMouse, etc. One goal this year is to introduce students across the district to Evernote to curate. These are my current curation tools (may be more, but this is what comes to mind):

    1. Twitter
    2. Google+
    3. Google Drive
    4. Evernote
    5. Diigo
    6. YouTube
    7. Pocket
    8. Livebinders
    9. Symbaloo
    10. Only2Clicks
    11. OneTab
    12. Tab Packager

    • Glenn,
      Thanks so much for sharing! That is an awesome list and if you don’t mind I’ll be taking some that you mentioned and adding to my own to try. I think you have caught on a key point that we are no longer consumers but creative collaborators. The great thing about online curation is that there are so many ways to do it and so many opportunities. Students and teachers now have incredible choice. If you don’t like a certain curation app there is probably another that better suits you… Or you can even develop one of your own. Good luck with your curating journey and stay in touch. I would love to have you do a guest blog entry on some of the ones you try this year!!!

      Kirsten Wilson
      Follow me on Twitter @teachkiwi

  2. Scoop.it is an excellent curation site. Users can add their own comments to the scoops and add tags for ease of location. Users can follow other scoops too. Learni.st is another site, similar to Pinterest, but designed for education. I like the collaborative aspect of Learni.st too.

    • Dorothy,
      I really enjoy scoop.it as well. I have heard about learn.ist and want to explore it. I have also heard educlipper has similarities to Pinterst and is designed for educators just like learn.ist. I love that there are so many ways to curate digital content. If you follow this blog look for a follow up on more curation applications. I am looking at Smore, Learn.ist, educlipper and Flipboard, just to name a few. Let me know if you would like to guest blog about your experience on learn.ist!

      Kirsten Wilson follow me on Twitter @teachkiwi

  3. Hello Glenn. I like your list. I also like a variety of readers to support my curating activity. Zite, Flipboard, and News-360 are my favorites. Like you, I would put Twitter at the top of my list. It’s amazing how versatile such a simple app can be!

  4. Its correct time to have the plans for future years and its time for you to be happy. We have read this post and if I possibly could I want to propose you couple of interesting points or guidelines. Maybe you can write subsequent articles referring to this article. I must read more aspects of it!

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